A comparison of the works by jonathan swift and alexander the pope

Pope is an excellent example of the first style: The second is named for the Roman poet satirist Juvenal also writing in Latin; his satire is distinguished by a contemptuous and indignant tone that employs harshness and realism to incite a return to a higher standard for whomever or whatever he was viciously attacking and satirizing.

Pope executes this through the mock-heroic form of The Rape of the Lock, his poem based on true events amongst his friends. Therefore the final comparison of the overall similarity and difference between the satire of Pope and Swift is that while Pope is a mild-mannered, gentle Horatian satirist, Swift is a vulture-manned, indignant Juvenalian satirist, which is a style that can be used to good purpose when and where the need arises for it.

Student Answers amberhelt Student Pope and Swift, contemporaries of one another in the eighteenth century, both used their famous works to satirize the society they lived in.

Swift is an excellent example of the second style: In the poem, we see members of high society engaging in a battle of cards, surrounded by many spirits, called sylphs, who encourage the intense emotions of the heroine, Belinda, and her antagonist, the Baron.

Juvenalian satire is used to vehemently criticize an individual or institution. His tool is humorous witty banter that exposes absurdities and follies.

Swifts work clearly highlights the great divide among the poor peasants and the rich landlords. Swift ridicules the poor to portray the callousness of the rich, upper ruling class.

Mock-heroic poems ridicule the heroic style and characters of classical epics. The audience finds themselves laughing both at the characters and themselves.

However, the two writers used different styles of satire to address their appointed audiences. As Gulliver travels to various remote locations, Swift explores the many vices of the institutions around him, from political parties to societal entitlement.

This paper shall look at both works The Rape of the Lock and A Modest Proposal and try to portray how the two works have highlighted issues of class, gender and race.

Both writers encourage change in society by looking at the flaws of their contemporaries; however Pope mildly teases the individual to speak to the whole while Swift bitterly criticizes the whole to speak to the individual.

The distinguishing feature of the two is therefore tone and intent: Pope uses Horatian satire, which is a form of mild satire that teases the follies of individuals as part of the whole of society.

They seem to have nothing better or constructive to do with their time: Hardison Certified Educator There are two forms of the rhetorical device of satire. In it he reduces social foibles to amusing poetic banter with the hope of bringing order and a return of sensible living to a social situation gotten out of hand.

He recommends a quarter of the reserve for males and three quarters for females implying that the female gender is more valued here for only one thing reproduction.

That the remaining hundred thousand may, at a year old, be offered in the sale to the persons of quality and fortune through the kingdom; always advising the mother to let them suck plentifully in the last month, so as to render them plump and fat for a good table Swift 7 He believes that the sale of the poor children would help improve the economy by reducing the burden of the poor in terms of feeding and clothing their children.

Pope shows a humorous indictment of the idleness and vanities of the 18th century rich class. In "A Modest Proposal," Swift tries to be and succeeds at being shocking and outrageous in his suggestions and statements. For instance, he suggests that there are individuals in Ireland that would be properly used for food.

By attacking society as a whole, Swift aims to anger his readers and spur action for change.

Compare the satire styles of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift.

Both works touch on the issues of class, gender and race. They are classical examples of the use of satire to pass a message. The two pieces of literary work are in different genres: The second is named for the Roman poet satirist Juvenal also writing in Latin; his satire is distinguished by a contemptuous and indignant tonethat Unlock All Answers Now Start your hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more, enjoy eNotes ad-free, and get the following: By poking fun at the individuals at this party, Pope is making a light-hearted commentary on the social customs of society as a whole.

One is named for the Roman poet satirist Horace who wrote in Latin; his satire is gently mocking and humorously cajoling in the hopes of inspiring a return to a higher standard for whomever or whatever he was satirizing.

Jonathan calls for the sale of the children of the poor begging mothers and other poor peasants to the rich landlords as food.

In the explanation of how this trade would be conducted swift clearly portrays the divide in class among the poor and the rich and how this affects their life and relations.

There are two forms of the rhetorical device of satire. Horatian satire has a mild smiling voice of indulgent wit that inspires improvement while Juvenalian satire has an indignant contemptuous tone of chastisement and harsh ridicule that is meant to incite reform.A Comparison of “A Modest Proposal” And “Rape of the Lock “The Rape of the Lock” by Pope Alexander and “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift are two pieces of literature from the 17th century.

The two pieces of literary work are in different genres: poem and essay respectively. They are classical examples of the use of satire to pass a message. Information recall - access the knowledge you've gained regarding Alexander Pope's best-known satirical work Additional Learning The accompanying lesson, Comparisons of 18th Century Satire: Alexander Pope vs.

Jonathan Swift, will teach you more about this subject. Comparison of the Satirical Works of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift 18th century English authors, Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift, were friends and rivals, and while they wrote on similar topics, their styles of satire were markedly different.

Comparison of Pope and Swift Essay Words | 7 Pages. Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift in their respective poems, The Rape of the Lock and The Progress of Beauty, offer opposite representations of the nature and function of cosmetics in eighteenth century society.

Pope and Swift essays Though there exist several different themes and writing styles in early 18th Century writings, two of the greatest satirists of all time and close friends, Jonathan Swift and Alexander Pope, shared some of the most effective, moving, and influential thoughts and writing styles.

Alexander Pope's satire in "The Rape of the Lock" differs from Jonathan Swift's satire in Gulliver's Travels mainly in the scope of its ferocity. While Pope teases the upper class, chiding them for their foibles, Swift clearly hates the political structure he satirizes.

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A comparison of the works by jonathan swift and alexander the pope
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